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As the only stable binary compound between alkali metal and nitrogen, lithium nitride has remarkable properties

wallpapers News 2021-05-07
As the only stable binary compound between alkali metal and nitrogen, lithium nitride has remarkable properties and is a model material for lithium ion energy transport applications. Following material design principles derived from the extensive structural analogy of hexagonal graphene and boron nitride, we demonstrate that this low-dimensional structure can also be formed from S-block elements and nitrogen. Both one - and two-dimensional nanostructures of lithium nitride (Li3N) can grow, although there is no equivalent van der Waals gap. Compared with bulk compounds, lithium-ion diffusion is enhanced, resulting in materials with special ionic fluidity. Li3N demonstrates the concept of ionic inorganic nanostructures assembled from a monolayer without the need for a van der Waals gap. Computational studies reveal a Li-N layer mediated electronic structure transitioning from bulk narrow-band-gap semiconductors to metals at the nanoscale.
 
Lithium nitride (Li3N) was originally proposed as the electrolyte for all-solid-state lithium-ion batteries because of its special ionic conductivity at room temperature (about 10-3 S cm-1). In fact, although many people have been trying to stabilize it for decades, it remains the most conductive crystalline lithium-ion conductor under environmental conditions due to its low decomposition potential. Doping late transition metals, however, induces electrical conductivity that can be used on anodes that can charge more than twice as much as graphite. Li3N has also been proposed for many other applications, for example, as a means of converting carbon dioxide into useful products, as an electron injection layer in organic light-emitting diodes, and as an unconventional reducer in the preparation of organic and organometallic chemistry.
 
In addition, in 2002, Li3N was identified as a potential candidate for solid hydrogen storage due to its capacity of holding 10.4 wt. % H26. However, slow H2 adsorption kinetics and high (dehydrogenation) temperatures are major obstacles to overcome before the Li-N-H system can be developed commercially. Through a combination of experiments and calculations, we show how the changes in the electronic structure and the shortening of the diffusion length caused by chemical nanocrystallization of Li3N lead to dramatic changes in the electronic properties and ion transport behavior.

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